i-teleportedbread:

kazuhira-the-dongler:

ryden-gg:

With modifications becoming more commonplace every year, it’s not surprising to see that many people know next to nothing about modifications, but still choose to get them with only the information that everyone knows. So here are some things that you probably didn’t know about modifications. (Like tattoos, piercings, and stretched lobes.)
You cannot get a tattoo when you’re drunk. This is because alcohol causes the blood to thin. When a tattoo gun touches your skin, it creates little cuts. Getting a tattoo while drunk can cause you to lose a lot of blood. Not to mention the fact that it might mess with the quality of the tattoo.
Some inks will react differently to your skin. For example, many people are allergic to red ink. This can cause a rash, which also might mess up the quality of your tattoo. Additionally, yellow ink fades really easily.
Acrylic is a big no no in all piercings. This includes stretched lobes. Acrylic is a bad material to use because it is porous. This means that it’s more likely to carry bacteria, which can really mess up your piercing and make you sick. Additionally, do NOT buy plugs that are made out of polymer clay. This is also extremely porous and can royally jack up your ears. Some good materials are Surgical Steel, Stone, and Glass.
TAPERS ARE NOT JEWELRY. Tapers are a stretching instrument that looks a bit like a cone. While these can be used up to a 2g, some piercers suggest avoiding them completely. Tapers should never be worn for more than a few minutes. This is because they weigh unevenly on your lobes, which can cause a bad stretch, tearing, and blowouts. Alternatively, bondage tape (which you can get at any Spencers) can be used to properly stretch your lobes.
Piercing guns are bad news! They’re completely unsterile, and they can cause serious tissue trauma. A piercing gun basically forces a blunt piece of jewelry through the skin. This causes the skin to rip open to make room for the jewelry. Then it places the jewelry snugly against the skin, giving no room for the piercing to breathe. An actual needle piercing, done by a professional, is much safer and MUCH less painful.
Tattoos are much more sensitive than you think, and they take a lot longer to heal than what people may tell you. First of all, while the pain can go away after a week or two, the tattoo will not be fully healed for at least two months. While healing, you have to keep the tattoo as safe and clean as possible. That means no baths, no tanning, no swimming, etc. You also must lotion it often (don’t over-saturate it) and wash it three times a day. Think of it as any other open wound. You wouldn’t let it get dirty, would you?
Everyone has a different pain tolerance. Asking your friend how much their tattoo or piercing hurt won’t be accurate to you, since you might have a higher or lower pain threshold.
Stretching your lobes is absolutely NOT supposed to be painful. At most, you’re supposed to feel a little pressure, but that’s it. When done right, it is painless. For some reason, people seem to keep saying that stretching is like getting a piercing over and over again, but that is completely untrue. Stretching is literally just that, the stretching of the skin. Additionally, you MUST wait between stretches. You need to give your skin time to relax into the stretch and regain elasticity.
I think this about wraps it up. I hope this was informative. I welcome (correct) additions to this post.
PHOTO SOURCE

,

VERY IMPORTANT

i-teleportedbread:

kazuhira-the-dongler:

ryden-gg:

With modifications becoming more commonplace every year, it’s not surprising to see that many people know next to nothing about modifications, but still choose to get them with only the information that everyone knows. So here are some things that you probably didn’t know about modifications. (Like tattoos, piercings, and stretched lobes.)

You cannot get a tattoo when you’re drunk. This is because alcohol causes the blood to thin. When a tattoo gun touches your skin, it creates little cuts. Getting a tattoo while drunk can cause you to lose a lot of blood. Not to mention the fact that it might mess with the quality of the tattoo.

Some inks will react differently to your skin. For example, many people are allergic to red ink. This can cause a rash, which also might mess up the quality of your tattoo. Additionally, yellow ink fades really easily.

Acrylic is a big no no in all piercings. This includes stretched lobes. Acrylic is a bad material to use because it is porous. This means that it’s more likely to carry bacteria, which can really mess up your piercing and make you sick. Additionally, do NOT buy plugs that are made out of polymer clay. This is also extremely porous and can royally jack up your ears. Some good materials are Surgical Steel, Stone, and Glass.

TAPERS ARE NOT JEWELRY. Tapers are a stretching instrument that looks a bit like a cone. While these can be used up to a 2g, some piercers suggest avoiding them completely. Tapers should never be worn for more than a few minutes. This is because they weigh unevenly on your lobes, which can cause a bad stretch, tearing, and blowouts. Alternatively, bondage tape (which you can get at any Spencers) can be used to properly stretch your lobes.

Piercing guns are bad news! They’re completely unsterile, and they can cause serious tissue trauma. A piercing gun basically forces a blunt piece of jewelry through the skin. This causes the skin to rip open to make room for the jewelry. Then it places the jewelry snugly against the skin, giving no room for the piercing to breathe. An actual needle piercing, done by a professional, is much safer and MUCH less painful.

Tattoos are much more sensitive than you think, and they take a lot longer to heal than what people may tell you. First of all, while the pain can go away after a week or two, the tattoo will not be fully healed for at least two months. While healing, you have to keep the tattoo as safe and clean as possible. That means no baths, no tanning, no swimming, etc. You also must lotion it often (don’t over-saturate it) and wash it three times a day. Think of it as any other open wound. You wouldn’t let it get dirty, would you?

Everyone has a different pain tolerance. Asking your friend how much their tattoo or piercing hurt won’t be accurate to you, since you might have a higher or lower pain threshold.

Stretching your lobes is absolutely NOT supposed to be painful. At most, you’re supposed to feel a little pressure, but that’s it. When done right, it is painless. For some reason, people seem to keep saying that stretching is like getting a piercing over and over again, but that is completely untrue. Stretching is literally just that, the stretching of the skin. Additionally, you MUST wait between stretches. You need to give your skin time to relax into the stretch and regain elasticity.

I think this about wraps it up. I hope this was informative. I welcome (correct) additions to this post.

PHOTO SOURCE

,

VERY IMPORTANT

(Source: rydenarmani, via spookykiwi)

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

(via gavinfreesbutt)